Changes to reporting injuries under RIDDOR (as of 6 April 2012)

Photo by gwire via Flickr, under Creative Commons Licence

RIDDOR (Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995) puts duties on employers, the self-employed and people in control of work premises to report:

  • serious workplace accidents;
  • occupational diseases;
  • specified dangerous occurrences (near misses).

Currently, timescales set out for the reporting of accidents and occupational diseases are as follows:

  • Death or major injuries must be reported immediately either online or by calling the Incident Contact Centre on 0845 300 9923.
  • Injuries that cause a person to be incapacitated (i.e. absent from work or unable to do work that they would normally be expected to do) for over three days must be notified within ten days of the incident using the appropriate online form (that can be found on the HSE website).
  • Cases of disease should be reported as soon as a doctor notifies you that your employee suffers from a reportable work-related disease using the online form ‘Report of a case of disease’.

As from 6 April 2012, however, RIDDOR’s requirement for reporting injuries causing incapacitation for over three days will change:

  • Injuries that cause a person to be incapacitated (i.e. absent from work or unable to do work that they would reasonably be expected to do as part of their normal work) for over seven (no longer three) days must be notified within fifteen (no longer ten) days of the incident using the appropriate online form.

Employers and those with responsibilities under RIDDOR must still keep a record of all injuries causing incapacitation of over three days (i.e. in an accident book) and it is recommended that organisations record all incidents and near misses in order to help them identify and address areas for improvement in their safety performance.

Luckily, RIDDOR-reportable incidents are relatively infrequent but organisations need to know what to do in case any injuries or notifiable diseases do occur. Guidance on reducing injuries and ill health in the workplace can be sought from the Health for Work Adviceline, as well as advice on complying with legislative requirements. Call for free on 0800 0 77 88 44 to speak to an occupational health professional.

This entry was posted in Tips & Ideas and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.